Mihintale

After spending much of the day at Anuradhapura, went over to Mihintale for a short visit. As it was Poya Day, this area was also very crowded. Exhausted and hot, we elected not to climb the 1,843 steps up to Mihintale. Instead we drove up to near the top and  climbed a shorter distance.

We would recommend others to do the day in reverse–Mihintale first when you have energy for the climb. Or spend two days seeing the sites. 

This site dates to 247 BC. It is believed to be where a Buddhist monk from India named Mahinda brought Buddhism to Sri Lanka by converting King Devanamplayatissa. As a result, this site is revered by the Singhalese.

At the top there are three places to climb further. One is Kantaka Chetiya, a dagoba built around 250BC. We tried to climb but the wait was too long so we only went halfway. 

Cows and Cars and Elephants, Oh My: Driving in Sri Lanka

This cow is about to get on the highway

Driving in Sri Lanka is an endless adventure not for the faint of heart.  

Let’s start with the roads. Many roads are single lane and well paved. Outside the cities most of the side roads are dirt. 

But size does matter. 

Apparently any road large enough for 1 car is big enough for cars going in both directions. This presents some interesting logistical and geometric challenges when a car comes face to face with a truck traveling in the opposite direction. 

Then there are your companions on the road. At any given moment, you might find cows, lizards, dogs, water buffalo and elephants sharing the road. 


There are also bicycles, buses, trucks, tuk-tuks (or three wheelers as they are called here), motorcycles, people.  And there are fruit and vegetable stands everywhere with lots of people stopping to buy. 

Three-wheelers are like mosquitos. They buzz around and move into any empty space on the road. Zip. Zip. Zip. 


Now, three-wheelers and trucks drive slower than cars. That means that it takes forever to get to your destination…unless you pass them. How to do that? On a real two lane road (one lane in each direction), beep twice and then pass. This can be tricky on curvy mountain roads. And sometimes, there are three or four slow moving vehicles in a row. Some drivers will pass them all in one shot. Others pass 1 at a time. 

With all of this we saw very few accidents. Sri Lankans are very good drivers. Though we did almost have a heart attack a couple of times. 

And one last thing, schools let out at 1:30 causing massive traffic jams. Try to stay off the road during that time. 

Polonnaruwa

Polonnaruwa dates to 1270 AD and was the second most ancient kingdom of Sri Lanka. It is a world heritage site with hundreds of Temples and other structures. 

There is almost 1000 years of history here. This was the capital of the South Indian Chola dynasty in the late 10th century. It sits at the head of a man-made lake that was created in the early 1200s. 
One of our favorite sites was Gal Vihara. This is a grouping of 4 Buddha images carved from one large slab of granite. 

The reclining Buddha is 14 meters long (about 42 feet) is said to be a depiction of the Buddha entering nirvana (after death). The site is very impressive and haunting. The first Buddha is 7 meters and is thought to be an image of Ananda, one of the Buddha’s disciples, mourning the Buddha’s ascendancy to Nirvana. 

Ouch, Ouch, Ouch….visiting temple in Sri Lanka 

We spent the last two days visiting ancient temples and ruins in the northwestern part of Sri Lanka. Today we were in Anuradhapura at Jetavaranama–the first capital of Sri Lanka from 380 BC to 1200 AD–and then Minhitale Temple–one of the most sacred places for Buddhists in the country. The sites were very interesting and fun to see. 

We’ve been to temples all over the world and today brought some unique experiences. First, it was prayer day. Once a month, usually after the full moon, the government announce Prayer Day and everyone goes to the temples to pray. Second, it was 31 degrees centrigrade. Third, the Sri Lankan temples have a million stairs. Even the hotels have a ton of stairs. Today we walked the equivalent of 40 flights of stairs. And finally, you cannot wear shoes in the temples. That means most of the 40 flights we walked barefoot on stones that were very, very hot. While we hobbled along with our hot feet feeling every hot stone, pebble and grain of sand, Sri Lankan’s of all ages easily walked and climbed and prayed. 

The morale of the story–train your feet and quads before going to Sri Lanka. 

More on the temples tomorrow. 

A Trip to the Market Street Hawker Center in Singapore

It’s noon, we are starving and we have 45 minutes before we need to be back for an appointment. We noticed a sign for the Market Street Food Center (at the junction of Market Street and Malacca Street). We walk up the stairs, through the car park to a door that says food court. Once through the door, we suddenly experience a wave of smells and warmth and people. There are tons of table and food stalls. Some stalls have long lines. Some stalls have even longer lines. We have arrived.

But First an introduction to Hawker Center Etiquette.

In Hawker Centers, there are tables for eating either in the middle of the stalls or around the stalls. It is open seating and they fill up fast. One of the first things you do when you arrive is to find a seat. This can look easy. It’s not. When you look around, you’ll see what looks like an empty table BUT there will be tissue packets or business cards on the table. That means those seats are taken. This is called CHOPE. If there are seats left, you are welcome to put your own tissue packet down to reserve your seat. Oh, and, there are no napkins. That’s why everyone brings tissues–to CHOPE and to use.

City Center Hawker Center

City Center is located downtown and is very crowded during lunch time. It serves office workers and executives. Our first task was to find a seat for three people–no easy matter. We were finally successful and then turned to deciding what to eat among the dozens of stalls. One trick of the trade–if you have time–find the stall with the longest queue. That is the most popular stall of the moment and is likely to yield a delightful experience. In this case the Curry Rice Stall had the longest line. We were in a hurry, so were not able to sample that dish. Curry Rice is very popular right now and we saw the longest queues for those stalls at a number of hawker centers.

We ordered from the Tiong Bahru Roaster Pig Specialist. We had four dishes: roasted duck with noodles, roast pork with rice, roast pork wonton noodles and a side order of Chinese broccoli. All for $13.50. Did I forget to tell you that the food in hawker centers is cheap? Each of the dishes came with soup. And, there are fruit and drink stalls that sell sugar cane and fresh squeezed fruit juices to go with your meal. The food was tasty–the duck was well cooked, though covered in a brown, oyster sauce which was okay. The roast pork was just the right amount if sweetness and “chardness.” The veggieswas drowned in sauce which was a little salty. Even with that, it was a satisfying meal and we were on our way in time for our next stop.

Singapore: A Tasty Delight Awaits on Every Corner

Ask a group of Singaporeans about their favorite dish or place to eat and you are likely to start a long and spirited debate about the best Hawker Center, the best place for chicken rice, chilly crab, Char Kway Teow. Debating about food is the national sport in Singapore, second only to traveling all over the island for the best [name your dish]. Upon your first meeting with someone from Singapore, don’t be surprised if one of the first comments is, “Have you eaten?” Followed closely by “Do you take Spicy?”
The people of Singapore take their food seriously! And for good reason–its among the best in the world. Just ask Anthony Bourdain or Gordon Ramsey or Andrew Zimmerman ……. or me!

Singapore is an island nation within striking distance of Malaysia and Indonesia and is the gateway to most of Asia. It has an extremely diverse population-Indian, Chinese, Peranakan, Malay, Eurasian and, now, second and third generation Singaporeans. The food has been influenced by all of these cultures into an exquisitely and endlessly evolving cuisine.

There are a lot of very good restaurants in Singapore. Every cuisine and every fusion possibility can be found in the country. I have eaten in many restaurants, but my favorite place has always been Hawker Centers–outdoor food courts found all over the place from city center to the residential neighborhoods. Hawker centers can have a handful of stalls or up to 100. Each stall has their own specialty. Most of the stalls specialize in a certain dish or a certain kind of food. Since there are many stalls, there are endless varieties of meals to select. Some hawker centers are well-known to tourists, while others are located deep within the neighborhoods. All are regulated and rated for food safety by the government.

At lunch with some friends, I recently asked people about their favorite Hawker Centers. During the ensuing heated conversation, I made a list of the places that I wanted to go: the Old Airport Road, Maxwell Food Center, Bedok, Amoy Street, Seah Im and several others. And so, I eat my way through the week.

Tomorrow we’ll start a tour of the Hawker Centers I visited.

Leave Your Heels Behind: A Road Trip to the Algarve in Portugal as posted in Adventuress Travel

See our article on our road trip through the Algarve in Portugal published in Adventuress Travel Magazine.

Leave Your Heels Behind: A Road Trip to the Algarve in Portugal

 

 

Top 10 things I learned at the New York Times Travel Show–Save $$ on Booking Flights

Top 10 things I learned at the NYT travel show:

When booking flights:

  • First step before booking check flights using aggregators (momondo, skyscanner, google flights – sign up for alerts when fare changes).
  • Most of these are not booking engines but search the internet for lowest fares
  • Aggregators do not include some low cost carriers like Southwest Airlines, EasyJet and Ryanair
  • Also check consolidators like flyinternational.com, cheapoair to compare
  • Don’t forget to check flyertalk for premium fare deals
  • You can predict air fare hikes by downloading hopper (app), airfarewatchdog, airfarespot, google flights
  • AARP members get 10% discounts on British Airways flights
  • Best time for fare deals tend to be mid-day Tuesday (when airlines release deals after reviewing weekend bookings)
  • Always clear your cache/cookies after each search, or use a different browser
  • Fares appear to be higher for Mac vs Windows users